Tuesday, February 10, 2015

What's in a name?

This is about an outing I had in early September. The Farmington river was in prime condition with flows that are to my liking. I had tied up a few soft hackles that I wanted to give a try. I saw the pattern for a fly called "grouse and flash" in Hatch Guide For New England Streams. The recipe called for pearl krystal flash for the body and grouse for the wing. At the time I had neither so I substituted pink holographic tinsel and partridge. What's in a name, and what difference does it make in what color or bird type is used. That's exactly what I thought when tying the fly. Then after reading some thoughts on the same subject I found out that others in the fly tying business and anglers as well came to the conclusion. It's more about what the fly represents, which is an insect struggling to hold on in an environment that's not letting it do so, than it's ability to match the insect precisely.

So I fished this fly and did so almost the entire time I was on the river. The trout responded very well and I enjoyed one of my better days on the Farmington that year.


The "grouse and flash" as pictured in the Hatch Guide. It is tied with the exact ingredients.


This is the fly I tied, "partridge and pink flash".


This Farmington river brook trout found the fly to interesting to pass up, as did many others that day, I might add so did the brook trout in Shenandoah.


I retired this fly, and as you can see it deserved it after the workout it received.

18 comments:

  1. Alan
    I actually like your tied pattern better because of the color you added to the body of the fly. Thanks for sharing

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bill Trussell,
      Thanks.
      That sort of pink flash seems to work well.

      Delete
  2. Always good to have a fly be torn up by fish rather than be lost to a tree.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I agree with Bill, yours seems a better pattern.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Atlas,
      Thanks.
      Another fella likes the pink body.

      Delete
  4. Yup, time to put that fly out to pasture.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mark Kautz,
      Thanks.
      Mark I have in a place of honor.

      Delete
  5. Very nice flies! Interesting that the body wore out before the hackle.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Kiwi,
      Thanks.
      Could it be shoddy tying?

      Delete
  6. I agree with the presentation of the fly is more important than rather you used the exact right tying material. Obviously, the fish agree with me too! Keep it simple.......................

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mel,
      Thanks.
      Mel that's true. Often times it takes a lot of years for us to figure that out.
      Guess that's what keeps the business going.

      Delete
  7. I like the looks of that fly Alan...God..you know all the good stuff..you are my hero!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. penbayman,
      Thanks.
      I can always count on my friend to the north. Or downeast.

      Delete
  8. I think your description of the draw that a soft hackle has for trout is spot-on. I've never found that a particular color really mattered too much when fishing them , their buggy attributes and the way they are fished in the surface film seem to be the major attraction for most trout.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. HighPlainsFlyFisher,
      Thanks.
      True Jeff. They really represent nothing but represent everything. Boy that's simplicity.

      Delete
  9. Retire that fly to the Soft Hackle Hall of Fame Brk Trt!!! Nice job!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. TROUTI,
      Thanks.
      Pete I did just that, now I can't find the Hall.
      Looking in Newington.

      Delete