Thursday, June 11, 2015

A day with an unexpected ending.

I fished a stream yesterday that I'm familiar with. It is one of Connecticut's prettiest by far and holds a good population of wild brook trout, and the surprise brown from time to time. The brook has a few feeder streams with one in particular that I have fished and reported on. Along its banks is a beautiful red barn, and not to be outdone by the barn the wildflowers put on a color extravaganza worthy of the time to sit there and just take it in.

This day was not unlike others, I chose to fish the main stream which took me a good two hours. I hooked many brookies, all on dry flies but felt a little bummed out. For as many as I hooked not a one came to hand. Still a good day and I still had a hour to fill up before I had to leave.

I decided to fish the red barn brook. The few times in the past that I worked its waters I have done well. I remember fishing a deep pool right under a stone bridge and taking an impressive brook trout on a size 10 Picket Pin. Another time a beautiful brook trout slammed a BA Caddis, which is another large fly. So I opened the fly box and looked for a BA Caddis, none there, because they are all at home. Continuing to look for a suitable alternative I noticed a couple of stimulator's. I selected an orange bodied one and started fishing. I fished the stream a few yards upstream of the stone bridge.


It did not take long before I had several strikes. The issue was the fish taking the fly or should I say trying to take the fly were no bigger than the stimulator.


With time running out and still nothing to hand I had convinced myself that I had a wonderful outing. Casting the fly into a riffle which is seen on the right side of the stream. As the fly ended its drift a fish struck. I felt the hook set and the fight was on. Several moments passed and the trout showed no sign on submission. I could tell the trout was a nice one, and hoped the hook wouldn't pull free. The little glass rod did well in handling the trouts runs and shakes.

What seemed like an hour of battle the trout finally gave up. As I reached in the water and placed my hand under him I could not believe what I saw.

This is by far my largest brook trout of 2015. Beautifully colored, gorgeous blue halos, a true masterpiece. And to think I was about to call it a day.


BA Caddis on the left, and a Stimulator on the right. Always keep a few in you box.



25 comments:

  1. WOW! Alan that is an absolute giant of a wild brookie. What an encounter! beautiful colors and amazing spot to fish - very cool. Well done.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hibernation,
      Thanks.
      Will taking a brookie in such a stream as this is not uncommon, but one that size. Like you said wow.

      Delete
  2. Replies
    1. Apache Trout,
      Thanks.
      Indeed John.

      Delete
  3. Now there is one fine specimen!!!! There is always time to make one last cast!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. TROUTI,
      Thanks.
      Pete he sure was. That last cast, magic.

      Delete
  4. That's one nice brook trout! Those last casts can yield surprising results. Nice job Alan

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mark,
      Thanks.
      Mark, I was surprised at his size. Love those last few casts.

      Delete
  5. Beautiful brook trout, congratulations on the catch!

    ReplyDelete
  6. gorgeous fish! love 'red barn brook' too! and whatever bloom that is in the top shot...wow. so pretty and delicate!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. TexWisGirl,
      Thanks.
      Theresa that brook is such a peaceful place. Those flowers were so tiny and so beautiful I had to take their photo.

      Delete
  7. Your persistence paid off! Congrats! I am shocked at the size of that brookie (looks to be about a 12?) seeing as though that stream is so small. Is it deep in spots? I wonder if that brookie spends the winter, spring, and fall in the main stream and heads up "red barn brook" to seek thermal refuge in the summer months.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. RI brook trout,
      Thanks.
      I guessed it to be about 11 inches, but I'll settle for your even foot. That stream does have some deep holes, just under that stone bridge is one of them. The red barn brook gets kind of low in summer. I think he way work his way into the large stream below in the near future.

      Delete
  8. Alan
    I don't why but I always want to think a brown trout is a bit superior to the brook and rainbow when it comes to strength; just my opinion. The colors on that brown are outstanding. Did you try any wet flies on this outing? Thanks for sharing

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bill Trussell,
      Thanks.
      Bill that's a tough one. They all seem to be physical when necessary. The issue in a small stream is they know where to go, and how to use the structure to their advantage. I pretty much used dry flies. I did fish a few soft hackles.

      Delete
  9. Every picture tells a story and what a story that fish is................. You know, Alan, just one more cast!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Gramps (Mel)
      Thanks.
      Mel, and what stories the do tell. I know it well.

      Delete
    2. Alan, I forgot to mention here, I have moved my blog back over to Blogger instead of Wordpress. I just didn't feel right over on that format. Missed most of my friends. Could you please eradicate the link you have for Gramps Gone Fishin' and put my new one on your blogroll. Appreciate it much!

      http://fishin4walter.blogspot.com

      Delete
  10. It's great to see that the big ones are still alive and well.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. RKM,
      Thanks.
      Kirk, I wanted to try that stream last time there.

      Delete
  11. I had a an evening like that yesterday but It didnt have a good ending....

    Andy

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. becks and brown trout,
      Thanks.
      Andy I can relate to that.

      Delete
  12. Replies
    1. RM Lytle,
      Thanks.
      That's what I'm going to say concerning that awesome brown you took.

      Delete