Tuesday, December 29, 2015

A Late December Outing 12-27-15


Hemlocks, and laurel with a few hardwoods stand as sentinels on this misty cool late December morning. The little stream flows out of the hills of eastern Connecticut tumbling over rocks and boulders on a migration to a larger body somewhere. On this morning I walk along this stream in search of wild brook trout. Is it the only quest this day, not hardly for the finds are many and the rewards are great, the brook trout are the crowning glory though and this day was a grand one.



The waters were looking glass clear. I usually spook the little trout from their holding lies at the back of the pools but today there were few in these locations and I soon found them in the heads and just below the plunges. I can only guess as to why they were there but food had to be a reason.


The brook trout seemed to take the fly as I gently lifted it to the water surface. They were cold and beautiful as they lay in my hand.


The early winter landscape looks barren. Trees devoid of leaves and stream side vegetation gone. There is still beauty in such quiet surroundings.


This wild spirit of the stream was taken as a coyote looked on. He was a few yards away from me and looked on for a few seconds and bolted.


I came upon these lush green moss covered rocks. Quietly I sat here and enjoyed a cup of coffee from my thermos. The brew had cooled some but none the less it was welcomed.


My day was coming to a close and one of the last runs I fished I hooked a little surprise.


I have never taken a wild brown in this stream, but there he was. A handsome fellow. Look at his rear fin, look familiar?

This was a wonderful day.

26 comments:

  1. Great fish. The colors are amazing. Lots of small streams around here I've been wanting to explore.

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    1. Deerfield Fly Shop
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      Mike I have fished a few streams in your neighborhood. Nice brookies up that way.

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  2. The brown is just the prefect ending to your outing!

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    1. TROUTI
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      Pete he sure was a surprise.

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  3. Fantastic post. Congrats on the wild brown in a stream you've never caught one. You really never know what species of fish you're going to find. I love surprises like that. Beautiful photographs, per usual, Alan! I love the way those mossy boulders pop and contrast within the bed of brown leaves.

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    1. Justin Carfagnini
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      Justin that stream has given up nothing but brookies, where that guy came from is a mystery.

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  4. Your work is inspiring. I wonder what advice you have for those looking to get started exploring/fishing small brook trout streams.

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    1. J Dono
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      If you have the time explore this blog. Lots of good info here.
      There are also a couple of good books out there. "Trout from Small Streams" by Dave Hughes, and "Fly Fishing Small Streams" by John Gierach

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    2. Thanks! I've been working my way back back back through old posts and you've compiled quite the resource. I actually found your blog while researching the Gray Ghost and I've been hooked ever since.

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  5. Alan
    I am sure you notice the four red dots that lined up perfect on the first brook you landed, "special". Rain is headed your way, after leaving the south flooded. It will be weeks on end before I can make it out to fish the tailrace, lots of generation. Thanks for sharing

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    1. Bill Trussell
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      Bill I noticed those perfectly aligned dots. We had some wintry mix going on but that is all rain now, and it's filling the water supply nicely.

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  6. What else can be said about such an awesome day in Connecticut?

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    1. Mark Kautz
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      Mark I have nothing to add.

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  7. Great outing! What's that fly in the brown trout's mouth? Looks kind of like my shrimp pattern.

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    1. RM Lytle
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      Rowan that fly is so simple. And so effective.
      Easy to tie also.

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  8. Alan cool last fish...do you think it is a cross with a Brown and a Brook because of that fin? Interesting!

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    1. Adam
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      Adam a cross would be a tiger. But that brown had something get into the gene pool.

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  9. Beautiful pictures and story as always, Alan. That wild brown definitely had a brook trout fin on it. That first brook trout is interesting with the four orange spots right in a row on it. Beautiful fish.

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    1. Parachute Adams
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      Sam I have caught a few that had colored fins but this one was really pronounced. That brookie was special in the fact he had his dots in order.

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    2. Haha! Those bright dots were definitely in order, Alan. Beautiful fish.

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  10. Alan, that brown trout with the brook trout fin reminded me of a vacation I had to sandwich mass. Their was a hatchery nearby that I visited and it was predominantly tiger trout. Do you catch tigers in your area of the world? As always beautiful photos and beautiful landscape. I always look forward to your posts after hard days work.

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    1. Brad Basehore
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      Brad I have visited that hatchery several times and they produce some big tigers. I'm told they stock them in the ponds on Cape Cod. In all my years of fishing I have taken 4 wild tigers. They were small and came from streams. They are hard fighting fish.

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  11. Hi Alan, just catching up on a few posts and seeing that little brownie with the black and white flash took me back to my early days of fly fishing on my local river here in Wales the Sirhowy. I caught many a little brownie marked just like that. Have to say i am a little envious - you can fly fish for trout during the winter, over here we have a legal close season running from end of Sept to start of March. Though we do have another fly taking salmonid in the River Rhymney over in the next valley; the Grayling which is a winter fish. Still not much chance of casting a fly right now, it has not stopped raining here for weeks and the rivers (streams really) are angry brown torrents....

    John

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    1. Grannom
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      John all wild trout are so precious, and when you prick a brown where you least expect it to be it's quite a thrill. We are indeed fortunate to have open streams through most of the year. Rain is good but to much rain not so good. If you fish enjoy your Grayling. I love hearing from anglers around the world.

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