Wednesday, September 28, 2016

Two Small Streams

On one of those cool mornings we experienced last week I found myself checking a couple of small streams. With the tough summer here in the northeast I was not certain what I would find. Both of the streams hold good populations of brook trout and in the past they have given up a few surprises. While walking in to the first stream I was happy to see water flowing and in some locations deep pools. The stream is in deep forest with plenty of hemlocks and hardwoods which help to keep its waters cool, on this day they were 62 degrees. The fly chosen first was a dry. It soon brought a fish to the surface, several as a matter of fact but not a hookup. These brookies were small but spunky.



Crystal clear water, a brook trout can be seen coming off the bottom for a dry fly.


Moving on to the second stream I also found a good flow along with cool water. In one pool a rise was observed, I suspect it was an ant or a beetle. I tied on a black ant and soon found out that was the right choice.


This beautiful brookie, in great condition was at hand.


Moving along the stream I came to this pool. I have never taken a trout out of here and was convinced there were never any in here until my brother-in-law John took a nice brookie here back in the spring. I figured it was deep, good flow and an undercut rock so maybe.....the ant was cast and nothing, a soft-hackle was cast and nothing even a shiny brass bead head could not bring a strike. I then tied on a streamer, remembering that's what John was using when he took the brookie last spring. I cast the fly, by the way the little "Cane and Silk" 5 foot rod did quite well in casting the #10 featherwing. The fly landed on it's side and floated for a second until it was wet. As it began to sink I saw a dark shadow move to it, and then back away. I cast the fly again and began to strip the fly in. The strike came fast and hard, I knew I had a good one.


Everything worked, the fly , the rod and the angler. In moments the wild trout was at hand. It was dark like so many of the brook trout in this stream, and it's blue halos were amazing. As I released the jewel I could see it move to the darkest place in the pool. "Farewell friend".....












20 comments:

  1. Alan, it amazes me where you actually pull some lovely trout from, another cracking entry.

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    1. George
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      George these brookies amaze me. Where you think they may be they're not and where you think they can't be "wham".

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  2. Alan - It's great to see those streams in good shape and their residents doing well. Very nicely done! I have to get a look at that rod, sounds sweet

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    1. Mark Wittman
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      Mark they held up pretty well considering what they endured this last summer. I hope fall and the coming winter are kinder on them. The rod is outstanding.

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  3. Such a beautiful world you present us with, Alan. I can't wait to get back to my favorite brookie stream this weekend!

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    1. Fading Angler
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      Chris it's easy considering my all that helps me do just that. I'll be looking for a report.

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  4. Brk Trt-good to see the natives have survived the summer. Beautiful pictures. I have fished that same pool too without much luck. Glad to see there is at least one resident brookie in there!!! A very nice one too!!

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    1. TROUT1
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      Pete the Family Secret is going to be awesome once it really fills up. That pool is a frustration for everyone that fishes it.

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  5. Alan, great to see so much water in those streams and to see that such a nice Brookie survived this torturous summer. What gorgeous fish, and I'm glad you are liking your new rod. I may have to get one once I get the money.

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    1. RI brook trout
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      Jon I believe those brook trout are so tenacious. Fall should be for angler and trout. I sold a rod that I haven't fished in years, and turned it into that small stream beauty.

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  6. Alan, the second photo reminds me of a brook trou stream I fish in northern pa. ,have never caught a trout their. But have never tried a featherwing either. It always bugs me when I see an area that I know holds fish but I can't get any of them to play. As usual through your persistence you caught some beautiful specimens. Thank you for the photos.

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    1. Brad Basehore
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      Brad luckily I remembered John taking a nice brookie there last spring on a streamer, otherwise I would probably have not caught anything in that pool.

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  7. A couple of perfect streams Alan.

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  8. Mark Kautz-Shoreman
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    Mark if we had some rain they would be much better.

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  9. You truly fish in some of the most beautiful places Alan. Great stuff as always...

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    1. HighPlainsFlyFisher
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      Jeff I am fortunate. New England is a small stream paradise.

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  10. Another gem of a small stream, Alan. Beautiful water and beautiful brook trout. Good sized ones as well. Best, Sam

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  11. The most beautiful trout of all. They still find a way to survive despite our encroachment on the waters where they live. So amazing.

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    1. Parachute Adams
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      Sam I'm going to respond to both of your comments, hope you don't mind.
      There are a few streams that can give up a few "biggies", and once in a while I find them.
      Brook trout are fighters. They will hold on to every inch of stream they can. The issue is man keeps on challenging them.

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    2. Alan, just wondering...are there brook trout above and upstream of that water fall? I can't imagine how the brookies could get past that to populate upstream. Maybe they figured it out during high water at some point. Regards, Sam

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