Monday, October 16, 2017

The "Ginger Caddis"

October and the thoughts abound. The caddis, what a great month to fish this erratic flying insect. Truth is the caddis is a fly that I fish with confidence the whole year, and I would add with success. Most streams that I have fished have caddis, and even though the hatches are scarce the trout will not let the bug just float by. While there are many caddis flies out there and most work like charms. Here is my version of a caddis that will work in October and the other eleven months...again simplicity is key. Here is the "Ginger Caddis"



The fly is tied on a curved hook, some with a wing of different material. This one has a wing of marabou from a partridge. On others I use a small amount of elk hair. The body material is fox squirrel from the belly. This material is awesome, it comes alive in water. The hackle is ginger partridge, on many of these I'll tie them with 3-5 turns of the feather.


This version is tied without a wing. You can see the spikiness of the body material. This fly get attention.


Here is a wild jewel caught in October on the Ginger Caddis, next will be November and so on.













16 comments:

  1. Sorry, I missed the Saturday post until today. Even if you don't catch any fish, Blueberry Muffins and coffee would hit the spot in my book. The fall, well all the pictures of the Northeast are great. Keep them coming. That you in the post below?

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    1. Mark Kautz
      Thanks
      Mark the muffins and coffee was a highlight of the trip. I'm fine with no fish, the scenery and the company was great. Yes that's me.

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  2. I love the looks of that fly! I'm headed to some Smoky Mountain brookie waters this weekend and will tie some up. How do you prefer to fish it, dead drift or swing (or both)? Also what length and type of leader do you like this time of year? Thanks as I'm still learning the small stream/soft hackle technique.

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    1. dawgvet1
      Thanks
      I envy your going to the Smokies, you should do well.
      I'm honest when I say this, I'll fish it any way, dry, wet dead drift and swing. This is a fly that works well. My leader is the same most all of the time...3ft furled, with about a 4ft 6x tippet.

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  3. Beautiful, Alan. It's Grouse season here and the luck has been very good so far. I've saved every feather I can get from the birds I've taken. I was wondering how to use those great ginger/marabou feathers. You just showed me!

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    1. mike
      Thanks
      Mike congrats on your hunting success. The feathers should serve you well. Grouse are very special in tying soft hackles.

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  4. Alan
    Outstanding flies, just gorgeous looking.

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    1. TROUT1
      Thanks
      Pete I appreciate the comment.

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  5. Beautiful flies, Alan. I appreciate the ideas you pass along with tying flies. I love the under wings on these caddis soft hackles.

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    1. Parachute Adams
      Thanks
      Sam all of us fly tyers gain from each other. I'm learning everyday.
      Those soft marabou feathers move nicely in the water.

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  6. very good patterns projects on the caddis fly, they are very beautiful, tell me that the hook is a Mustad 200R ..? or similar I will try these patterns at the beginning of our fishing season in November. Thanks Alan, I congratulate you as always for your good taste to tie flies.

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    1. Armando Milosevic
      Thanks
      Armando the hook is a Allen N202, they are good hooks and they are not expensive. You could also use the Mustad C53S hook.
      Good luck on your season opener...let us know buddy.

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  7. Anything caddis is a winner for sure Alan. Another beautiful wild brookie.

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    1. Howard Levett
      Thanks
      Howard caddis will usually win out on most outings.
      That brookie was all dressed up for the ball.

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    2. Very nice spider variations, Alan. Folks sometimes don't see the orange/ginger October caddis around because they mostly hatch after dark, but the fish know about them ;=)

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    3. William Shuck
      Thanks
      Bill that statement is so true. They key in on the fly wherever I fish it.

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