Thursday, August 9, 2018

Stop and Look

Why do we fish? Well that's a simple question and and equally simple answer follows...it's to catch fish. Very true and you will not get an argument on that from me. But, there is so much more to fishing and if you only believe that catching fish is why you do it then reading on is probably not for you.

I spend so much time not fishing when I'm fishing that if it were a law I'd be in jail. Scenes like you see here show just how much more there is to fishing. A little stream seems to void of fish, when in fact there are quite a few. A dry fly dropped on the slick still pool brings a rise. Now being a splashy rise the other fish head for cover.


Just look at all the places you'll find fish in this photo. I'll not tell you the spots instead I'll let you find them.


Wide open spaces, sunny spots. Not ideal for sure but you can see the places where a fly will connect.


Now here is what I mean when I say I spend as much time not fishing as I do fishing. This little water fall had my attention for quite some time. I took several photos and sat on a rock just thinking about the trout that use the area of the falls. When there is high water do the brookies leap the falls. In the deep run below the falls do they hold and hide. The wood jam is also beautiful in it's own right. Next time out stop for a few minutes and see what's really going on, it's like catching that big one.







26 comments:

  1. Nice post Alan. We've turned the page and we're now into August. Aug is the month all the night insects (crickets, katydids, and locusts) serenade us all night long with their singing. Turn off the AC, open the window and enjoy the music.

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    1. John Dornik
      Thanks
      John we are inching our way into that "glorious season"...and the lovely sound of the "night" bugs are sweet tones. The AC was turned off this morning and the fresh air is again moving through.

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  2. Yes Alan, so much to see and take in while on any water fishing. I often sit and watch a; pool fish critter, bug or just sit and listen to the sounds.

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    1. Doug Korn
      Thanks
      Doug when the non necessary sounds are removed the mind can once again hear what is pure. More to it friend.

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  3. Maybe it's an age thing. The older I get the more I find myself walking and looking, the fishing almost becomes secondary. I do it with hunting, too. I still take my rifle but I find I'm simply going for long walks in the woods; and I like it that way. Nice post, Alan.

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    1. mike
      Thanks
      Mike it most certainly an age thing. I feel the smae way while hunting, even calling it a hike in the woods with a rifle. I pick up the shotgun and hit the thickets for a woodcock, if I score that's great but if I don't that's great to.

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  4. There was a time I was mesmerized by a swirling foam "ball" that had collected in an eddy that I watched it for probably ten minutes. Definitely understand what you are saying... probably need to take more time and just slow down when on the water.

    Great post, I'd love to float a fly alongside some of those rocks and banks...

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    1. Michael Agneta
      Thanks
      Mike you have done what many of us do, and your perspective is true.
      And those rocks and banks hold a couple of wild ones that will take your fly.

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  5. Absolutely bang-on Alan. I always say that this world is full of small magical worlds. I remember once in Spring in Ireland, Galway in fact, Sue and I were fishing a river with wet flies and in front was small meadow by the river carpeted in primroses and all kinds of other flowers. We had our lunch just sitting looking at it and afterwards didn't fish the tempting run on the other side. We'd got what we needed. John

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    1. The Two Terriers
      Thanks
      John you nailed it. What you and Sue gained from that flowered lunch was better than what you would have taken from that run.

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  6. Yes, stop and smell the roses. Great post.

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    1. David-Mary Noll
      Thanks
      David you said it quite simply. We should take part in the saying.

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  7. This is an excellent post! There have been numerous times in the past where I have put the rod down just to take in what's around me and simply watch some small brookies go about their daily lives. Small stream fishing is so much more than just catching fish.

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    1. Chris "Kiwi" Kuhlow
      Thanks
      Chris you just have to love those brookies in quest for survival. Guys that fish small streams seem to have the same feelings about the goings on that take place out there.

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  8. You are a true woodsman, Alan, having a love affair running water.

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    1. William Shuck
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      Bill sounds crazy, but so very true.

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  9. You can't get more truth in a post than you just said. It's not just about the fishing.

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    1. Mark Kautz
      Thanks
      Mark so true buddy. I've had many a skunk in my day but I never had a bad day.

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  10. Alan
    When I was younger it was all about catching as many fish as I could on any given outing. That was my tournament fishing days with the big bait casting combos and big bass boats.
    Getting reacquainted with the fly rod some years ago has been the best thing that has happened to me in my years of fishing.The fly fishing has enabled me to slow down and enjoy the surroundings where I'm fishing much more now days; the greatest therapy in the world. Enjoyed the post thanks for sharing

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    1. Bill Trussell
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      Bill we all seem to go through that same progression where more is a must. Age seems to enlighten us to the finer points of fly fishing and the greater enjoyment that comes from catching all that is out there.

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  11. You sure do live in a pretty area. That water fall probably was very calming too. But, do go back and see where those brookies are!

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    1. The River Damsel
      Thanks
      Emily sorry about the late response.
      I sometimes think about the fortunes of living here, and then I go fishing to see it first hand. I will return....

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  12. My brother in law and I just talked about this last weekend. We were wondering the same thing and he mentioned something I hadn't really thought of. At high water, like really high water that fall wouldn't exist. That area would be just rock under the main stream. The fish could move freely where ever that wanted at that point. That's probably how they get to various places.

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    1. Kevin Frank
      Thanks
      Kevin your brother in law is right on. Barriers like that little water fall are of no problem even without high water. But high water will take it out. In an outing Mike and I were fishing a small stream. He was sitting on a rock and there was water flowing over a permanent section of bedrock. Mike was watching small 2-3 inch brookies trying to jump over the obstacle...tenacity.

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    2. I watched browns trying to climb a dam like that before. They had no chance getting over it but they still tried. I wonder how long they'll do that for.

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