Thursday, October 15, 2020

Small Stream Reflections "an October day"....

Looking into a quiet pool of a stream. The trees of autumn reflecting as if an artist was at work. This is a look into what a day as such can mean to all who give it a try. The morning was cool on this Farmington river tributary. The sun made it's debut and with it's angle now gave the term "shadow" a new meaning. Although very bright there were many dark places within the stream. The rocks along the edge the stream glistened as if they were ice covered and though they were not they still required careful stepping for they were slick. Slippery rocks are natures way of slowing down a small stream angler so as to allow him to take in all the beauty that surrounds him. 

In a pool like this you could choose a dry fly or a wet fly and be able to fish them both with equal success. The wet fly would probably bring you more activity where as the dry fly would bring you an explosive surface take.

 

 

A mini leaf jam. These are common this time of year and each one seems more beautiful then the next.
 

A brookie that took a soft hackle.
 

The fast water where it enters the pool is always a great place to fish. This day I chose to tie on a bright yellow dry fly. After several casts the fly was taken with a splashy rise.
 

This male could not resist the dry fly. It is now mid October, only a short time remains in this "glorious season".....
 

 

15 comments:

  1. Aaah, Fall in the North East. Very colorful.

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    1. Mark Kautz
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      So gorgeous. Mark we may take a drive up to King Arthur this weekend.

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  2. Beautiful. Natty and I fought some gorgeous orange hued brookies yesterday, alongside some golden hued brown trout.

    Glorious season indeed.

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    1. Nathan Camp
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      Nate I hope she was able to catch the biggest. I fished the area where I first met you and Natty. Quite slow only managed one.

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  3. That's a gorgeous piece of water, Alan. The leaf dam is as beautiful as it is fragile. The tamaracks are the only color we have left up here; the woods are now wearing their muted winter gray attire.

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    1. mike
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      Mike those leaf jams are so numerous and each one is different. Come back tomorrow and they are gone. That dark gray November woods, not looking forward to it.

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  4. That’s beautiful writing, and I thank you for it.

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    1. Keith
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      Kieth I so appreciate your comment.

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  5. "In a pool like this you could choose a dry fly or a wet fly and be able to fish them both with equal success". Just curious Alan, do you ever fish a multi fly set up or dry/dropper?

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    1. Dean F
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      Dean I have fished a dry dropper. Most times the combo works well. Then I go back to the single fly.

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  6. Sweet post Alan! I had a good day yesterday on stocker rainbows. The cottonwoods and aspens are starting to turn but it's nothing like what you have in the northeast.

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    1. billp
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      Bill good to hear of your success. Stocked fish are OK buddy. The mixture of types of hardwood trees make for some gorgeous fall foliage.

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  7. Alan
    You've probably noticed me saying many times in some of my replies on your post how I envy where you live and the absolute gorgenous streams you fish. This is another one of those post that makes me wish I had moved to the Northeast when Cathey and I were younger. Our trip a couple of years ago made us realize that even more when we saw the beauty of the area.
    Dreaming of what could have been and viewing all your fantastic post over the years of the area will surfice for not living there now. I could see the top image on someones den wall. Thanks for sharing

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    Replies
    1. Bill Trussell
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      Bill the northeast has issues, mainly winter but the rest of the year there's no place better. I visited a stream I had not fished in many years, while it has changed dramatically it was a beautiful sight.

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