Wednesday, October 6, 2021

Some list my friends...

While fumbling about the internet the other day I came across an interesting bit of fly knowledge. The question was "what's the most recognized trout fly" My guess would have been a Partridge and Orange soft hackle, well did I get an awakening. The Partridge and Orange did not even place in the top ten. I recall the Parachute Adams as the #1 fly with the Elk Hair Caddis #2 or #3.Well no big deal I still think the Partridge and Orange is right up there as #1 or two.

Silk thread especially YLI orange silk is vital in these soft hackles. The thread goes on as a bright orange but when wet it takes on a deep brownish orange. The body color represents many of the streams natural insects.
 

 

You can see that rich brown color in this fly.
 

A beaver pond brookie from this morning. The pond was a stream before the beavers dammed it up in multiple locations. The access is horrible with the mud but when there is a will.... This colored up male took a soft hackle, the Partridge and Green.
 

 

15 comments:

  1. Great colors on that brookie! I haven't had great luck yet with the Partridge and Orange (technically I tied Grouse and Orange). It's amazing how much confidence in a fly contributes to its success. In a previous post, you mentioned going up to a size 10 helped with hookups. Is that true for this fly too?

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    1. Shawn
      Thanks
      Shawn the more you use a fly the greater the confidence gets.
      I do not tie this in #10 as of yet. 12's work so very well.

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  2. Where there is a will, there is a way. My life motto!!! Especially in the last 10 years. The Adams is usually a pretty good fly for catching out here. I think all of mine have bright pink hi viz. Hahahahaha. Poor old eyes.

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    1. The River Damsel
      Thanks
      Emily that motto also rings true here. The Adams is a "money" fly and I pull it out at those times when I need a catch.

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  3. I can see the EHC as a very recognized pattern; it's everywhere. I've never used one that I can remember, though I have a few in very small sizes. Dries have never been my taste; bombers and haystacks being the exceptions. Beautifully colored-up fish, Alan. Gorgeous.

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    1. mike
      Thanks
      Mike I can relate to having flies in my box that I've never used, like Catskill dries. I guess I keep a few because the Catskill fly is such a big part of our passion. The orange is becoming more pronounced.

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  4. Hi Alan

    Despite other members of the clubs I am in having great success with the partridge and orange, this is a fly I have only has rare success with - I have no idea why?????

    What a 'Boulevardier' that Brookie is, I am sure he will the pick of the ladies shortly!

    Take care & stay safe

    Alistair

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    1. Alistair
      Thanks
      Alistair it's funny how some flies work well for others and not us. I find that at times with fishing spots on the streams I fish. Ideal places and i can't even get a bite.
      He is a stunner.

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  5. Alan
    Braver Dams are a magnet to attract fish, weather it's cold water or warm water species. Impressed with the soft hackles--thanks for sharing

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    1. Bill Trussell
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      Bill I have a love hate relationship with beaverdams. They can cause the stream to warm up at times and create lethal temps. And they can silt up the bottom. Wintertime is where these ponds excel.

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  6. The last fish I caught was on a partridge and orange, Alan. Drifted through a somewhat fast run I had a micro shot 8" above the fly which hesitated during the drift. Fish on and fish off as it came towards me. It released itself and I was good with that.

    Best, Sam

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    1. Sam
      Thanks
      Sam I love fishing the P&O in fast waters. Your point to fish on fish off is well taken and I agree. It keeps the excitement in the game.

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  7. Alan,
    This post is a true American classic! The patterns (your tying especially) and the brookie at the end are exceptional!
    Partridge and Orange was the first color of the magnificent three (Sylvester Nemes' choices in his first book) that I tossed in our ponds and was totally blown away by the reception it rec'd! That was many years ago and I still rely on these three anchors when the feed is on or near the surface! Your patterns are simply amazing Alan in their grace and beauty! Thank you for doing what you do at the vice and along the stream side!
    From the Den, Dougsden

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    1. Dougsden
      Thanks
      Doug the three choices I'm assuming were Partridge and orange, Partridge and Yellow and Partridge and Green. All are great choices and I have had success with the green and orange, yellow not so much. Both bluegills and small mouth have taken these flies. I kind of like that guy Nemes....Are the colors changing outside of the den?

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