Tuesday, March 3, 2020

North Country Spiders

I had the desire to tie up a few North Country Spiders last night. So with "The Three Pickers" CD playing I got out the silk threads some hackle and tied up some classics. These flies are incredible, such a delight to tie and fish. So little material and so much fish catching capability. I get so much pleasure in tying a fly that has been around for over a century, actually longer. Using silk thread adds so much to these simple flies. Along with the sparse hackle there is a simple elegance to the final product.



The Partridge and Orange. This is probably the most recognized of the North Country Spiders. It is one of the flies that can still be found most everywhere.


The Purple Dun. This spider is not likely to be found in fly shop bins. But may soon be a favorite of some.






19 comments:

  1. They have always been some of the most beautiful flies to me....nice job!

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    1. Chris "Kiwi" Kuhlow
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      Chris I believe that the Atlantic Salmon fly are the most beautiful creations ever. But they are extremely complex. The North Country Spider is as elegant but without the complexities.

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  2. Alan
    These Spider patterns are a perfect compliment for my 2/3 wt. fly rod using a 6X tippet---simple and productive!! Thanks for sharing

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    1. Bill Trussell
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      Bill they are a true match for that outfit. I have fished these flies on the Farmington with great results.

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  3. Replies
    1. Mark Kautz
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      Mark you are a kind soul.

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  4. Replies
    1. billp
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      Bill tie up a few and drift them on one of those NM mountain streams.

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  5. Alan, Silk thread. Such a joy to tie with.

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    1. John Dornik
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      John the silk threads make these flies work. Along with the seductive movement of the hackle.

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  6. Fantastic ties as alway Alan..........

    Those anglers, tyers and stream watchers of old were certainly on to something with these patterns!

    There is a small upwing / mayfly that hatches over here called the 'Purple Dun' (Paraleptophlebia cincta). The male spinners look to all intents and purposes the same as Iron Blue Duns (Baetis Niger) but with three tails instead of two. From what I can gather, they have a wide but fragmented distribution across the UK. I have only noticed them once, I found a small swarm of courting males in mid July up on the Tees in County Durham.

    Thanks for sharing

    Alistair

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    1. Alistair
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      A tip of the hat to those anglers and fly tyers of the past.

      Interesting facts on that Purple Dun. I can't wait to try it when the weather warms. The brookies will take it I'm sure, but the browns I'm not sure of.

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  7. Alan, on my end, the partridge & orange is known as the Carot Nymph. Yes, with 1 "r". I should check to see if there is any difference between the two, pretty sure there isn't, except for maybe larger size hooks. The Carot Nymph is a known producer of cutthroat & rainbows.

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    1. Matt Harding
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      Matt I have heard of the Carot Nymph, somewhere along the way. Do you fish it?
      I'm going to tie up a few P&O in a large size and give them a try.

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    2. I do fish it, & catch fish sometimes. I get more takes on dark color spiders though.

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    3. Matt I tied a version of the Carot, as a soft hackle. The brookies liked it.

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    4. Now, why haven't I thought of that?

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  8. Yes Sir, Scruggs, Watson and Skaggs. Great stuff.

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    1. Brookie61
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      Kurt that's one hell of a CD. Those boys can pick.

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