Monday, October 5, 2020

Deerfield Headwaters...Tiny Tenkara And Brook Trout

Saturday Jeanette an I took a drive up north to visit some streams that feed the Deerfield river. The morning featured some heavy fog in some areas but the promise of sparkling fall weather helped clear the fog in mind and eventually the skies cleared and set forth the start of a very memorable day. The foliage was sort of dull probably the cause of dry conditions of late summer. Still there were pockets of brilliant colors. The water conditions were fairly good with flows that were adequate.

We turned off the main road and drove up along a larger tributary. A few miles on that small road we came upon a bridge that crossed the stream. I sopped the car and got out to check things out when I heard two very large dogs bark. Looking about I saw a large fenced field, a small barn and a house. That is when I saw a man with the dogs coming towards me. The man introduced himself and said he was the owner of the farm. We talked for awhile and he spoke of the changes that have taken place over the  many years. He asked if we were here to view the foliage and I said yes but also we were here to fish. He said he was not a fisherman but gave me some advice on where to fish. As it turned out his advice put me onto a beautiful stream.

 

 

He told me where to drive and said not to be concerned about the conditions on the road. He assured me I would have no issues. He was right.
 

The stream was gorgeous. The access was near the road and did not present any problems with access. The stream was full of little plunges and pockets which were perfect for fishing with my Tiny Tenkara rod. I used an elk hair caddis to start the day, and would have stayed with it all day if I had not lost it to a stream bed rock.
 

My first brookie to hand. The sections of this stream I fished were full of these precious little guys.
 

This is pretty much how the stream looked. In those little pools were waiting brookies.
 

So very dark, and so very pretty.
 

 Lunch...these taste like steak when your hungry.
 

Another jewel, this is where the caddis bit the dust and the real action started.

This section of stream produced a great deal of action. In a 20 yard span I must have hooked a dozen brookies. One fish in particular to the fly and danced about like a small salmon. I thought it may have been just that.


When it came to hand it turned out to be a light colored brookie, that was easily the largest fish of the day.


The Tiny Tenkara rod got quite the workout that day and handled it well.


This is the fly that worked very well that day. The style this Tenkra fly has a name but it has slipped my mind right now. I will post the recipe in my next blog.




 

21 comments:

  1. Alan,
    That looks like a memorable trip. Glad you were able to share it with your better half.
    JJ

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    1. Beaverdam
      Thanks
      Joe she likes going with me most times, especially when the stream is clear of bushes and brambles.

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  2. Nice creek Alan. Who carries the container?

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    1. Mark Kautz
      Thanks
      Mark all of the stuff needed was in the car which in this case was near the stream. It all worked out very well.

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  3. Alan
    You choose the right rod to fish those small pockets in that stream. No need for casting and very little wading I assume. Just wondering why some of the trout were so dark? Thanks for sharing

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    1. Bill Trussell
      Thanks
      Bill the only wading was wet, and that was by accident. The trout most times take on the color of the waters they live in. Some streams have a high concentration of tanins which come from the hemlock, pine, spruce needles which fall into the stream giving the water a color similar to tea.

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  4. Beautiful day for you Alan. I’m dealing with extremely shallow, still water in these parts because of the drought resulting in some very spooky trout. I would love to know what your technique for not spooking them with the short line of a Tenkara? Do you cast up stream only?

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    Replies
    1. Dean F
      Thanks
      Dean I spook my share of trout, believe me. Most times I'll try to fish broken water. That way the trout that hold there are secure for they have an obstructed view. I also use as much natural cover as possible. Large rocks trees etc. Very seldom do I fish casting upstream. Dropping your fly into plunge pools is also very productive.

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  5. What a great day spent with Jeanette, fishing to boot. Nice of that fellow with the dogs to put you on to that beautiful stream. Those first brookies are dark as can be. Amazing to me the variations in colors. They are chamelionlike the way they blend in from stream to stream.

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    1. Sam
      Thanks
      Sam he was a great guy to talk to. In the short time we spoke he provided so much information, some fishing but much more on life. Brook trout are diverse and can adapt to their surroundings.

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    2. Alan, it sure is nice to run into people like that fellow, most especially these days. Also, I love a good hot dog and I bet those tasted great!

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    3. Sam, it's a rare thing for someone to take the time to just talk in this hurry up world. The hot dogs were a real treat out there.

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  6. I can taste those dogs right now..

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    1. Bureboyblog
      Thanks
      Outdoors like that they taste so much better. They travel well and do not require much to prepare.

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  7. What place. Fantastic, beautiful and what dreams are made of. Well, mine are! Stay safe, John

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    1. The Two Terriers
      Thanks
      John I'm in your corner....safety first.

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  8. Sitting here at lunch break in my office filled with mask-weary fellow travelers, so thanks for taking us on a fine exploration of a native brook trout stream and man, I need to get some frankfurters in the fridge at home. Looking forward to the recipe!

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    1. Ned Zeppelin
      Thanks
      It's always a pleasure bringing you along with me. Franks are a mandatory staple here, don't tell my doctor.
      The recipe is posted in the newest post.

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  9. very good the special stream for tenkara, right? ... delicious are the sausages that Jeannette prepared ... !!! mmm...

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    1. Armando Milosevic
      Thanks
      Armando streams like these are perfect for tenkara. Those sausage taste like t-bone steak when your outdoors.

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