Saturday, July 24, 2021

Small stream friends? Well maybe

Seeking brook trout in small streams has always been interesting for me. The fact that you never know if there are actually brook trout in the stream and if they are will they be there when you are fishing it. Brookies are notorious wanderers, they will seek new areas of a stream for various reasons. It's a wonderful game of "hide and seek"....There is another interesting tidbit to small stream fishing and that is what other species of fish cohabit the stream along with the brook trout. Some of what i have encountered have been brown trout, redfin pickerel, black nose dace, various types of bass and blue gills-sunfish. Several of these fish compete with the streams food sources and some of them are the streams food sources. With this going on it seems that the brook trout survives. There are many reasons for the survival of brook trout under these circumstances. I like to believe they are naturally friendly. I can hear the chuckles out there but you either dominate totally or you learn to adapt and coexist.
 

 

Such was the case in the stream above. This sunfish took a small downwing hornberg. The little guy earned a spot in the SSR's hall of fame for the strong fight he put forth. Notice the scars on the side of that guy.
 

Just a few feet south if where I hooked the sunfish this dark brook trout slammed a soft hackle. This fish was awesome and the photo does not do it justice.
 


 A few posts ago I mentioned tacos. Well here is what I created. Highly seasoned ground beef, lettuce, tomato and native corn. Drizzled with a squirt of lime and red pepper it was delicious. No cheese added because I forgot to buy it.

Have a great weekend folks....

 

17 comments:

  1. Beautiful sunfish and trout! While exploring new streams, it is always interesting to see what turns up. I still haven't caught a redfin pickerel. Today I visited a favorite stream close to home for the first time since Elsa visited and was surprised to see how many logs got moved around. I was also happy to encounter far more trout than on any previous visit. It seemed like a combination of perfect conditions and hopefully improving skills. All brown trout (and nothing else) on this section of stream but I have encountered brookies in its headwaters.

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    1. Shawn
      Thanks
      Shawn the redfin is a favorite of mine. I don't catch many and when i do it's a time to celebrate. The streams did undergo some transformation with the heavy rains, it's good to refresh and scour the streams.

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  2. Some years ago I was camping upstream from a local lake. A hot Summer day and snorkling seemed to be in order. I encountered something in the Pike family. The American River, trout country, and Pike. Truly another adventure.

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    1. Mark Kautz
      Thanks
      Mark a pike is one hell of a formidable fish. I have only caught one, and that was by accident. Face to face underwater with one is a close encounter I'll leave to others.

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  3. Hi Alan,
    It's been a while since I've written, but I haven't missed a single post on SSR. I've been pleasantly surprised that the small stream natives here in the Berkshires seem unfazed by the big floods we've experienced over the past few weeks. You can tell the incredible force and volume of the floods by the way the streams have been dramatically re-sculpted in places - logjams torn out of one place and recreated in another and whole riffles created where there were none before. The brookies are still present in force, while the stocked fish are nowhere to be seen. Gotta think the brookies have evolved over time to cope with these spates.

    Planning to take my grandson tenkara fishing next week. Should be fun.

    Take care,
    John

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    1. John Strucker
      Thanks
      John I know you are out there and reading SSR's. Our wild natives are a strong breed. Much like us New Englanders. I have a few streams I fish in the Berkshires and I am anxious to see how they fared. I hope your tenkara adventure with your grandson is all that you hope for.

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  4. The brookie is adaptable, resilient, fearless... there's a lesson in there for me; for us all.

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    1. mike
      Thanks
      Mike they are tough SOB's and can handle all that nature throws at them. Unfortunately man is another issue.
      Take care buddy..

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  5. I like the idea of brookies being friendly, but they sure are merciless when it comes to their prey! Tacos are great - now take the same ingredients, roll them in a soft taco or bigger corn based tortilla, find some good enchilada sauce to pour over, cheese, oven and yum. Kevin

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    1. Ned Zeppelin
      Thanks
      Kevin there is few more vicious strikes then that of a brookie. The soft taco is what I should have used. They are easier to handle and when warmed a bit taste so much better. Your additions sound delicious.

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  6. Alan
    Whatever grabbed that sunfish was not another fish---in other words, it was meant to be food for some hungry predator. Nice brook trout taken--thanks for sharing

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    1. Bill Trussell
      Thanks
      Bill perhaps a heron or a weasel. Glad he got away.

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  7. Alan,
    I have been waiting for a post like this! I am so glad to learn that co-existence between differing species happens more than I realize in your beautiful Connecticut waters! I could live and fish and be in these special environments! Thank you for posting and giving each one of us such great joy!
    The Bluegill and Bass fishing has been exceptional so far this season!
    Dougsden

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    1. Dougsden
      Thanks
      Doug there are a few get-a-longs in our streams. In a way it's exciting not knowing what may be taking your flies. I hope you have been benefiting from the rain as much as we have.

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  8. Those brook Trout are stunning, wish we had them in the south of England!!!

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    1. James Denison Angling
      Thanks
      They are spectacular. But come autumn their colors really come forward.

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