Sunday, September 26, 2021

1 For 5.....

Rain and so much of it has created a special time to be a small stream angler. With exception of some cloudy water in the pools the stream was in great condition. It had been about four months since I last visited this stream and was somewhat surprised that the heavy rains of August had not changed it much. Those prime runs and pools were pretty much the same. The main thing was the erosion of the banks. The heavy rain had caused some impressive ruts a few of them had filled with dead leaves and presented a problem walking.

The run in the first photo was a bit frustrating in the fact that I had three hookups and lost every one of them. I assumed they were browns but this stream also holds brookies.
 

 

This run was also an issue. I had several trout come up for the fly only to miss it. And to add insult to my capabilities I also hooked up with one and lost it. Not to give up I continued to cast the fly in hopes that my luck would change. Well it did.
 

I finally brought one to hand. My fishing day was at end and part two was going to take place.
 

The woods in the area have quite a few hickory trees, and that means hickory nuts. I think we were about a week late for the bounty was collected by the squirrel population. We managed a few and they are worth the effort.
 

What a place to take a break, have a cup of coffee, maybe a snack and just sit and think how wonderful life really is.
 

 

13 comments:

  1. What a gift to have our freestone streams in such good shape this year, Alan. Such a beautiful wild brown. You're right, life appreciating simple things in our natural world is a gift also.

    Best, Sam

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    1. Sam
      Thanks
      Sam it's a pleasure seeing ample water in our streams at this time of year. The next generation is looking to have a great start if things remain the same. Enjoy "all" that's out in our world.

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  2. Alan,
    If I may echo the exact sentiments as Sam above.....He said it so well!
    We are all very much blessed to have a love in our hearts for the natural world, the great outdoors! Thank you Alan for reminding us of your all too often over looked simplicity in life philosophy! It is unique in this day in age when complicated seems to be better! We all know better thanks to you!
    Another good post Alan! Connecticut is #1!
    Dougsden

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    1. Dougsden
      Thanks
      Doug the great outdoors is great and it's there for all of us. Free admission to boot. If we have two things we are working on we are fine, but add a third and that's when issues arrive. Keep it at two and keep it simple and you'll be happy.

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  3. These variables keep things interesting. I fished a section of stream yesterday with a good population of browns. I had lots of strikes on my elk hair caddis but only landed one fish in over an hour. Later on, I stopped at a culvert on a tiny stream that I have driven by numerous times but was never convinced that it was worth stopping for. Brush was too thick to get down to the stream and all I could manage was an upstream bow and arrow cast under the branches while crouching on the rim of the culvert while outlined against the sky in full sun. Far from ideal. I was thus shocked on my first cast when an 8" brookie darted out from under some roots and slammed the fly. I managed to keep it from making it back into the roots and landed one of the prettiest fish that I have ever seen. All told the stop took about 2 minutes. I am curious about exploring more of this stream but it is well defended by thick brush and swampy ground. What a contrast between working hard to catch one fish on an easy to fish stream versus instant success on a near impossible location.

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    1. Shawn
      Thanks
      Shawn two things never to pass on when fishing small streams are culvert pools and bridges. They are hot spots. A third place to give a try would be a white foam slick on the surface. Explore that stream, especially now in this fall season. Great job on the cast and catch of that brookie.

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  4. Thursday will mark the end of our season here, so I'll be living vicariously through your posts until April. 4 inches of rain here yesterday; everything that was fishable has been blown out. The power of water is truly incredible. Wonderful post, Alan, thank you.

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    1. mike
      Thanks
      Mike I remember the times when we would take 5 days vacation leading to the end of the season. Rangeley was in just about full color and the trout and salmon were very active. Upperdam was on fire as were the other not to be named places in the region. I have an interesting post coming on soft-hackles. A lot of questions in my email about hackle.

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  5. Ya can't beat a stump like that for a good coffee break.

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    1. Mark Kautz
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      Mark, stumping for a good stump...

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  6. Alan
    You know how to take advantage of everything you encounter on these trips. Persistence helped you land a colorful brook trout, and nature provided you with a place to sit and relive the experience. What a way to enjoy the day. Thanks for sharing

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    1. Bill Trussell
      Thanks
      Bill even in defeat most times you can find something good out of it. Good coffee, good companions, and a good stump.

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