Monday, September 13, 2021

Cool Mornings And A Line Runner....

Cool nights and cool mornings make for flannel shirts and a coffee to go. Such was the day I'm going to tell you of. The crispness in the air is welcomed for it also gives brilliance to the wild flowers of the season. They sparkle in the sunlight as the dew runs off of them. Their colors preview what nature is planning in the next month. The crispness of the morning did not keep the mosquitos at bay, and it wasn't until a nice breeze picked up that put the little pests down.
 

 

The stream was sparkling, a mini light show in the sunlight. Most would pass up a run like this but not me. I had a streamer tied on and worked it through the run. No takes. I looked into the box and selected a fly that is known to produce very well this time of year...I'll let you figure out what that fly that was.
 

On the third cast a fish came up and took the fly. Here he is at hand.
 

Look at those colors.
 

This was a pretty swift  piece of water. But there was a soft seam there and quite possibly a fish holding. It was a cast that was not going to be pretty, you know the classic one where the fly floats gently along and you see the trout rise and take. No this was a throw it out and see what happens cast.
 

What happened was this. This wild one actually ran line off of the reel before I was able to gain the upper hand...strong brookie.
 

Have you figured out what fly I used?
 

 

23 comments:

  1. Aaah, Fall (almost) in the Northeast. Days are getting shorter and nights are getting cooler. I suspect that Brookie would give a good fight. Nice size.

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    1. Mark Kautz
      Thanks
      Mark it feels comfy putting on a flannel shirt on those crisp mornings. Now if we could only have it like that instead of cold and snowy. Also a hot blueberry muffin goes well on a crisp morning.

      Delete
  2. If there any honey bee's left, they'll be all over those Asters. I always wait to pull honey off the supers until after the Asters have gone by. That's a monster fish for that little run. Beautiful.

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    1. mike
      Thanks
      Mike the bees were working them. They were also on the golden rod. Places like that seam usually hold fish and I was lucky to be the one casting the fly.

      Delete
  3. I’m guessing this brook trout fell for a hornberg. Nice job, Alan.

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    1. Jim R
      Thanks
      Jim Hornberg is correct. It is a downwing version. It's very effective.

      Delete
  4. Another big brookie for you sitting in that seam, Alan. That fish is huge for a native. The brook trout appear to be well fed this year with heavy rain events washing food in to them. Beautiful photos.

    Best, Sam

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    1. Sam
      Thanks
      Sam the brookies are going to be in prime condition for the spawn, which should be good. A lot of brookies had full bellies when I caught them I suspect they were feeding heavily on night crawlers.

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  5. That fly looks like a no name Alan special to me.You may know I'm addicted to classic patterns especially catskills. Stay safe Alan we have yet to see the worst of the delta variant.

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    1. John Dornik
      Thanks
      John it's actually a downwing Hornberg. They are a much easier fly to tie then the traditional Hornberg.

      Delete
  6. Feels like one of the best summer/early fall's in years in terms of water levels... Those look like fish that are healthy and well.

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    1. Hibernation
      Thanks
      Will you are so right, I can't remember such levels at this time. Temperatures also have been good. It should be a great fall season.

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  7. It looks like I will be tying and trying the downwing Hornberg very soon. Easier to tie and acceptable to such fine fish sounds awfully good to me.

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    1. Shawn
      Thanks
      I tie them with two different colored wings. One with the yellow mallard wing the other with the natural mallard wing.

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  8. Alan,
    Beautiful brookie!
    Surely tempted by the size of that sandwich, a real effective fly!
    Colorful end of summer setting
    Humberto

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    1. Achalabrookies
      Thanks
      Humberto that Hornberg would work on those lovely brookies in your area. Yes we are now going into a time of year I call the "glorious season" so happy....

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  9. For everyone’s convenience, the link to Alan’s recipe: https://smallstreamreflections.blogspot.com/2010/06/downwing-hornberg.html

    Great tie, nice fish! Thanks for this post and the resources within this blog to tie this fly and so many others. Kevin

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    1. Ned Zeppelin
      Thanks
      Kevin some fine research. That was one of my first posts on the newly formed SSR's...endurance for both.

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  10. Alan
    So, so glad we are finally moving into fall and getting rid of the sticky humidity. Impressed with the colorful fins on the last brook trout you landed. Thanks for sharing

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    Replies
    1. Bill Trussell
      Thanks
      Bill that humidity is making a comeback here at least for a few days.

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  11. Alan,
    As always, such small water yielding such big & beautiful brookies! I love it! We are about two weeks behind you guys in New England as far as the seasons go! Our trees are starting to blush fall colors & the daylight is lessening every day! However, we are still awaiting the cooler nights! You lucky ducks!
    Great post Alan! Dougsden

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    Replies
    1. Dougsden
      Thanks
      Doug most streams will give up a bigger brookie, the problem is I spook them, but I'll figure it out.
      Looking into next week and some of the night time temps are down right chilly...bring on the fall colors and fall brookies.

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